THE WAY WE WERE – April 2024

THE WAY WE WERE

Culled by Judy Garrison From April 1924 issues of
The Andes Recorder – 100 Years Ago

WEEK IN AND ABOUT ANDES

Events of a week as chronicled by the Man on the Street

Winter renewed its energies this week and Tuesday afternoon and evening from ten inches to a foot of snow fell [April 4 issue].

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Barry Shaver has sold his farm at the school house in Gladstone Hollow to Frank Monastero, of New York, and gives possession April 15. The sale includes the stock and farm machinery and the price is $13,000. Mr. Shaver purchased the place from Reed Dumond a number of years ago. The farm will be remembered by former Andes residents as the Dickson place. Mr. Monastero also owns the former Crosier and Jackson farms in Gladstone Hollow. Mr. Shaver will move to the T. S. Miller place on upper Main Street until he decides on future plans.

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The question of houses to live in is a serious problem in Andes at present and there is no relief in sight. The new street bubble has exploded and there is no place to build if anyone was so minded. Even the towering block so vividly pictured and dreamed of by many has faded away like a mirage in the desert. [Ed.: Sound familiar? Comments?]

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Automobile agents are as thick as flies on a molasses barrel.

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There was another fall of several inches of snow on Sabbath [April 11 issue).

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[In the April term of county court]….  Irving McWhorter of Franklin also pleaded guilty to second degree rape and received a like sentence [placed on probation]. The conditions of the probation of these boys are similar. McWhorter’s follows: “Shall avoid all places and persons of disreputable character; shall indulge in no unlawful disorderly or vicious habits; shall not own nor drive an automobile for three years unless with his father or mother; shall remain at work on his father’s farm for two years without wages or until court modifies order; when he earns money he shall deposit one half in bank; shall report to Probation Officer Phelps every two weeks for a period of five years; shall attend church regularly and furnish certificate from minister to probation officer to this effect; shall not be away from father’s farm in the evening, unless accompanied by a member of family, for two years.”

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Bertha Mace O’Neal of Delhi and Elizabeth Miller Snyder of Corbett, two wayward girls, were committed to the training school at Hudson. The Miller girl, lying about her age, was married to George Snyder at Delhi last fall, having obtained a license at Franklin. Both of these girls are under 16 years of age.

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Elmer Burtch died at his home on State Road at 2 o’clock Thursday morning, April 17, aged about 41 years after an illness of only three days from erysipelas [a bacterial skin infection]. On Sabbath he picked a small boil in his nose and the face commenced to swell and when the physician was called Monday the face was black. He was a son of the late James Burtch and leaves a wife and two children.

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Stamford village trustees have sent to the factory for a man to repair the Johnson Memorial town clock in the postoffice building. It is reported that some miscreant had poured acid on the works, damaging parts of the striking apparatus. ~