THE WAY WE WERE – February 2024

From February 1924 issues of the Andes Recorder
100 Years Ago

WEEK IN AND ABOUT ANDES
Events of a week as chronicled by the Man on the Street

LaGrand Bouton died at his home at the head of Delaware avenue early Tuesday morning, January 22…at the age of 63 years…thirty-nine years ago he was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Cartwright, daughter of the late Dr. S. S. Cartwright. Sixteen years ago the family moved to Gladstone Hollow in this town, where they lived until less than a year ago, when they moved to Andes village. Besides his wife he is survived by three sons and five daughters, viz: George, Corbin and Harold Bouton in Andes; Mrs. James Bouton, of Roxbury; Mrs. Seymour McCall, of Walton; Miss Mary Bouton, in New York; Pauline and Mildred Bouton in Andes. [John Bouton: LaGrande would have been the grandfather of my father, Corbin Glenford. The name Corbin has been passed to my brother Corbin Norwood and to his son Corbin Nicholas of Roxbury. I live on the property of our father, Corbin or “Corby,” and grandfather who was known as “Dee.” He was married to Vienna who was Andes Town Clerk. To sum it up, that would make LaGrande my Great Grandfather.]

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A Bible Reading Contest between the Cabin Hill U. P. church and the Andes U. P. church, which opened on October 1, closed January 13, and was won by Andes.

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The books to be read were I and II Kings and Acts. Each book counted three points. One hundred thirteen questions were asked at the close on these books. Five points were given for each one who took part in the quiz, less 1 for each question missed. Memory verses from the Pslams [sic],1 point credit for each 10 verses. Andes had three times the membership of Cabin Hill. [Ed.: Entry goes on at length to describe the points allocation.]

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According to an old Scotch saying a sleet storm in February means a big fruit crop. Andes was visited by a sleet storm Tuesday.

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Leslie Liddle, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alden A. Liddle, formerly of Andes died at his home in Binghamton on February 3, after a short illness from typhoid fever. He was born in Andes 30 years ago and his boyhood spent here. [Ed.: I believe he grew up in Jim Andrews’ current house on High Street.]

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Miss Dorothy Emmel from the State Library division at Albany has been here the past week cataloging the books at the Andes Public Library. The initial opening will be Monday afternoon from 2 to 5.

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The custom which ordained that a woman may propose marriage to a man in leap year dates back seven or eight hundred years. An act of the Scottish Parliament, passed about the year1228, made it a crime punishable by a fine, for an unattached man to refuse to become the life partner of a woman who had the courage to “speak ye mon” she liked. The custom in milder form is referred to in a work published in the year 1606. [Ed.: Google (www.millearn
egardens.com) verified that for me, slightly altered: “Queen Margaret of Scotland was said to have passed a law in 1288 declaring that women could propose every 29 February—and that if a man refused, he had to pay a fine of a new gown, gloves, or a kiss.]

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Daniel Arbuckle, of Union Grove, and the fourteen year old daughter of Herman Slade of the Barkaboom, were married recently by Rev. C. E. Hewitt at the Methodist parsonage. [Ed.: I’m guessing that for her age to be mentioned, it was unusual for a bride to be that young in those days.]

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In Connecticut a new law provides that every egg offered for sale must be legibly stamped on its surface with the name of the farmer and the exact day on which it was laid. [Ed.: And we complain about today’s agricultural regulations!]

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The school house in West Settlement district, Roxbury, was discovered on fire soon after 9 o’clock on last Tuesday evening and had such start that it could not be saved. How the fire started is a mystery as the fire when discovered was in the front part of the building some distance from where the stove stood. The building was insured for $400. The teacher, Miss Pauline Bouton, of Andes, had about $50 worth of books and these and all the books of the 13 pupils were burned. Arrangements have been made to hold school in a tenement [sic] house in the district. This is the district at which John Burroughs and Jay Gould attend. [Ed.: I’m not imagining what I know of tenement houses on West Settlement Road. Maybe a commercial building with dwelling above on Main Street, Roxbury?]

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Fresh dispatches dated Lincoln, Nebraska, state Wallace Wallick, a well digger, shot and killed Judge William Morning of the court of domestic relations, and then killed himself. He also shot at a former wife and her lawyer but missed them. Wallick was in court on a charge of non-payment of alimony to a former wife who divorced him last October. The same press dispatch states that on January 29, 1924, Wallick married Ethel May Hansen, of Andes, N.Y. at Council Bluffs, Iowa. The Hansen’s came to Andes several years ago from the west and purchased the McDivitt farm in Gladstone Hollow and after a few years gave up the farm, and Mrs. Hansen returned to the west. [Ed.: Those small town newspaper editors were quite good at keeping track of former Andes dwellers.]

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There is a movement at Arena to form a stock company to build a power dam on the Haddow estate where ten thousand horse power can be generated. The dam would be only 50 feet long on the bottom and 150 feet on the top and would cover 70 acres. The blue prints have already been made.

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Isaac Merchant, of Margaretville, shot a big wild cat on the Mill Brook side of Mt. Pakataken recently. The animal was as large as a good sized dog. This is the third cat he has shot in as many weeks. Hunters claim that the cats follow the deer from the wilds of Pennsylvania. It is stated that in the Dry Brook and Beaverkill mountains there are many places where struggles in the snow tell the fate of a deer.~