The Way We Were — August 2018

Culled by Judy Garrison From August 1918 issues of

The Andes Recorder  – 100 Years Ago

 Week In and About ANDES

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Events of a Week as Chronicled by the Man on the Street————————————————————–—

With Commentary by Jim Andrews

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Fred Ruff, who left Delhi May 24 has arrived safely “overthere”. [Jim Andrews: Fred Ruff was Dave Ruff’s grandfather and Thelma Ruff’s father-in-law.]

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The heavy storm of wind and rain early Tuesday morning flattened many oat fields.

William M. Tuttle brought to this office oats which measured 6 feet 5 inches in length.

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David Ballantine sold his banking business in Andes on Tuesday to Chas E. Hulbert, of Downsville, who will open a national bank here. The sale includes the building and good will of the business. [JA: This, of course, was the Ballantine Bank located in what is now Ron Guichard’s real estate office across from Bohlmann Park. The location of this bank, after several robbery attempts and one murder, was moved to the lot adjacent to the blinking light at the foot of Delaware Ave. The bank board felt that a central location with more activity would dissuade would be robbers from trying to “crack the vault.” That building has since been razed.]

Mr. Ballantine, as a merchant and banker has been in business in Andes for 52 years and for 46 years had been connected with the banking business. In 1872, he succeeded Wm. .Dowie as vice president of the First National Bank and on the death of his father he became president, serving from 1889 to 1897 when the bank closed. Since that time he has conducted a private banking business.

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There was an importune celebration in Andes last Thursday evening over the news received from France. About 30 autos with over 100 people were here from Delhi. There was music by the Andes band and a Delhi drum corps, and speeches by Rev. J.H. Robinson, Delhi, and Judge M. Linn Bruce, of Andes. [Ed: probably the 2nd Battle of the Marne (July 15th to August 6th 1918) which was the last major German offensive on the Western Front during the 1st World War. The attack failed when the Allied counterattack, supported by several hundred tanks, overwhelmed the Germans in their right flank causing severe casualties. The German defeat marked the start of the relentless allied advance which culminated in the Armistice with Germany about 100 days later.]

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All instruction in the elementary schools of the state must be in English and from English texts, according to a resolution adopted at a meeting of the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York at Albany. It was stated that elementary subjects have been taught in various foreign languages, including German at certain schools, and it was to stop that practice that this action was taken. The rule does not affect the teaching of German in high schools.

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The hot wave of the season visited Andes this week. Tuesday it was 90 in the shade and Wednesday it was 91 degrees. This is the hottest weather since July 1911. [Ed: Sounds familiar—no?]

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Two men employed by the government are trying out a new process for making glue from casein, at the Avery & McKinney creamery at Meridale. The product is to be used in aeroplane manufacture.

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Anthrax, the deadly cattle disease, has caused the death of four cows in the town of Walton during the past week. Last Wednesday a cow owned by Bert Budine of Pines Brook died. E M. Latham, who occupies the Jackson farm, Frear Hollow, lost three cows from the disease.

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All patrons of the Andes Water Company are hereby requested to try and save all the water which may be possible, as the Springs have been shrinking very fast during the past two weeks. From present indication the country is about to face a serious milk famine.  Never in the history of dairying were cows known to drop off in milk production so early and to such an amount.  Another factor is that there will be fewer winter dairies kept as many do not care to repeat the experience of last winter. Eggs will be scarce, as last year many large dealers lost several hundrerd dollars and have either gone out of business or reduced their flocks.~