The Way We Were – January 2013

100 years-thumbnailCulled by Judy Garrison From January 1913 issues of

The Andes Recorder  100 Years Ago

 Week In and About ANDES

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Events of a Week as Chronicled by the Man on the Street

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With commentary by Jim Andrews

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A masquerade ball with 38 numbers was held on New Year’s evening at Perry Warren’s on Cabin Hill.

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The most destructive storm of the season swept over a wide area Friday night carrying great loss of property in its wake. Wire communications in all sections were crippled.

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In Andes it was the most severe wind in several years. The roof on the old part of William J. Hyzer’s barn on the Turnpike, was lifted off and carried down the hill and left a wreck on the ground some distance from the barn. Mr. Hyzer had put on a new roof of rubberoid only the past summer .[Jim Andrews:  I googled this and it appears to have been a type of tarpaper with stones imbedded in it. It is a brand name (Ruberoid) and is still being manufactured using modern components.] The newer portion of the barn was covered with a steel roof and this was not disturbed. The roof was also taken off an old barn belonging to Thomas Cowan on Palmer Hill.

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Dr. C. C. Faulkner, of Arena is ill with small pox, and before it was known what was the nature of the disease many became exposed by going in to see him. A report that there are some cases on Dingle Hill is not confirmed, but school in the lower district is closed awaiting developments. [JA: The early vaccinations for smallpox used an active virus.  Marguerite Fowler, whom I have quoted many times, was a child in the 1890’s and received such a vaccination along with others in her school class.  One of her friends, Helen Gladstone (later Helen Hanlon, Pete Hanlon’s wife) had a pre-school aged brother who was very upset that he couldn’t get the vaccination like his older friends.  So, the older “friends” placated him by vaccinating him.  One of them who had the vaccination scab on his arm (we older folks remember getting those scabs and the resulting scars) took a needle and scratched the young boy’s arm and took some of the pus from under his scab and placed it on the scratch.  The youth consequently developed smallpox and almost died.

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William Johnson, aged, 82, died in Delhi, January 3. He was one of a party of half a dozen who went from Delhi to California during the gold craze of ’49. He is survived by his wife, who was a dauter of Ebenezer Maxwell, three sons and a dauter. [Ed.: Interesting that the editor refers to a “gold craze”, not “the gold rush” as we know it from our history books.]

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The little daugter of Mr. and Mrs. Merton Signor, on High street, about a year old, had a narrow escape from poisoning from eating morphine tablets. [Ed.: Don’t we need a prescription to get these nowadays?] [JA: You bet we do. In 1913 many dangerous drugs were prepared locally and were sold at the local pharmacies (such as Norton’s Drug Store). Given that this child lived on High Street, I would suppose that his parents got the tablets from Norton’s—now Paisley’s!] It was supposed that an elder sister had secured the tablets from a drawer and gave them to the child. Timely discovery averted fatal results.

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The Dinner Committee of the Delaware Valley Society has secured from the great wizard and inventor, Thomas A. Edison, the second Public Hearing of his New Disc Phonograph, for the Annual Dinner of the Society, at Hotel Manhattan, on the evening of January 25, this wonderful machine reproduces perfect human tone. There is not the slightest metallic sound. Voices of beautiful and famous singers are reproduced in all their natural softness, sweetness and strength. ~