The Way We Were – December 2010

100 years-thumbnailCulled by Judy Garrison  From December 1910 issues of

The Andes Recorder  – 100 Years Ago –with commentary by Jim Andrews

Week In and About ANDES

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Events of a Week as Chronicled by the Man on the Street

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Delaware county now has a population of 45,575, as against 46,413 in 1900, a loss of 838.This is a gain of 76 over the population in 1890. [Ed.: The population count went down after that, was around 41,000 in 1970, and according to the 2000 Census now hovers above 48,0000.  One of the rare statistics that hasn’t changed much in the last 100 years.]

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Arrangements have been made by which the people of Andes can enjoy a treat.  The New York Ladies Trio will give an entertainment in Union Hall, Andes, Saturday evening, December 3.  This company has entertained in nearby towns and have pleased all. Geo. W. Hulbert, of Downsville, recommends them highly.

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The Andes and Delhi stage made its trip Tuesday with sleighs, but found very poor sleighing.  A damp snow had fallen during the night. [Ed.: Do any of our readers know what these skidders or ski-like contraptions were?  Did they add them onto the wheels of the stagecoach or have separate sleigh vehicles for snowy conditions?]

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Albert Ruff, who purchased the Roney farm on Palmer Hill, has sold the wood on 50 acres to the Arkville acid factory.  It is estimated that the tract will yield about 3,000 cords of four-foot wood.

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Much lagrippe prevails here. [Ed.: influenza does sound better in French!]

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George Marx had had a telephone installed in his harness shop and is on the farmers’ lines [JA: I believe that George Marx’s harness shop was in the building that stood between Andes Connection Ltd. and Chace Randall Gallery.] 

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The five Italians who have been cutting wood for John Connor, left Wednesday for New York.  Too much cold for the sons of Italy. [JA: I know about the housing conditions for the Italians who worked on the D & E railroad but not for the laborers on individual farms.  The railroad workers lived in shacks (they were called shanties then)]. 

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 Thos. Bouton and F. C. Chamberlain have filled their ice houses this week with 10 inch ice from Tunis lake.

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Downsville has the swellest and most up-to-date little theater in Delaware County…the manager Mr. Hulbert has secured the famous romantic actor Clifton Mallory and his company of professional artists to produce the great English standard comedy drama “Caste”…He has also, by a special effort secured a special theater train on the D. & E. for this occasion, in order that all in the vicinity of Andes who wish, may be able to attend this classical entertainment.  This train will start from Andes in time to reach Downsville before the entertainment begins and will return to Andes as soon as the drama is over. [Ed.: The writer continues to gush over Mr. Mallory and the theater for many more lines.]

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Friday evening the farmhouse on what is known to older Recorder readers as the Ferguson farm, and which for many years had been the home of William R. Seacord, on the hill overlooking Andes village, was totally destroyed by fire and with most of the contents…..Mr. Seacord will re-build as soon as possible and for the present will take rooms in the village. [JA:  This was the property now owned by the Cox family.  The replaced house still sits on the hillside outside Andes up behind Vera Matthew’s house towards Palmer Hill.] 

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Joseph L. Hughes passed away at his home in Andes village on…December 22.  Mr. Hughes was born in England, at Cheltham, on October 21, 1838, and when six years old came to America with his parents….When his country needed his services he responded to the call and in 1861 enlisted in Co. K 11th New Jersey Volunteers and served throughout the war.  His regiment became a part of the famous Sickles brigade and was in many of the most important and hard fought battles of the war, among them being the battle of Gettysburg, one of the decisive battles of the world [sic].  …In 1878 he came to Andes, where he has since resided, and was beloved by all.  He could relate vividly details of his experiences of early life and during the war and anything read was never forgotten.  His mind was a vertable [sic] storehouse of knowledge.  Among his daughters were Mrs. T. W. Miller of Andes and Miss Clara Hughes of Andes. [JA:  Mrs. Miller was married to Thomas Miller, the editor of the Andes Recorder and was the mother of Mural Miller, the last of the Millers to do printing in the Recorder office.  Many locals my age or older remember Mural and Gladys Miller and some may remember Mrs. T.W. Miller (even I vaguely remember her) who had a small antique shop in the Recorder Office.  As an aside, the Hughes plot at the lower cemetery has a large monument and at one time the plot had a large, Victorian urn style planter (cast at the foundry in Delhi) which Mural and Gladys always kept full of flowers all summer.  One summer night this huge urn, along with an antique cast iron bench from the Dowie cemetery, were stolen with the thieves never being discovered.]  ~