The Way We Were – January 2007

100 years-thumbnailCulled from January 1907 issues Of The Andes Recorder

 THE NEWS IN AND ABOUT ANDES

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 What Andes People are Doing and  Saying These Winter Days

Monday S. D. Oliver, J. L. Hughes and Fred Oliver commenced the work of painting the interior of the Hilton Memorial High School.

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A. J. Fairbanks arrived this week to begin the work on the Andes depot. He informs us that the work will require about two months.

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The Pure Food law went into effect January 1, and we trust that good may result.  You must not use butter coloring hereafter, Mr. Farmer.

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Andes can not grow until some one builds more houses.  We understand a farmer near here wishes to retire and buy a house here.  The only place to move to is to move out of town which some may have to do.  Some property owners contemplate raising their rents.

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Thomas Leyden has rented his farm on Dingle Hill to Howard Atkins, of Margaretville, who recently married Miss Lizzie Houck, of  Griffin Corners.

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Thursday one of the Italians working at the Fowler cut met with an accident.  He was using a bar, raising up on it when it slipped and he was thrown forward and as he fell put out his hand and the little finger caught on a hook on a car and was torn open from the first joint to the end and the bone laid bare.  Dr. Gladstone dressed the finger and put the flesh back onto the bone and hopes to save the finger.

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John Beckwith has rented rooms in the old Hunting hotel building and with his dauter (sic), Miss Anna Beckwith, will move thereto April 1.

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Charles Hilton died about 5 o’clock Tuesday morning, January 15, with Bright’s disease, aged about 47 years.  He was better known to our people by the nicknames “Duck” and “Cap.”  The funeral was held Thursday with Rev. H. D. Chace officiating, and the interment was made in the lower cemetery.

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It is stated that the D. & E. will begin running a passenger coach as far as Fowler’s Station about February 1. [Note:  Jim Andrews informs us that Fowler’s Station was also known as Kaufman’s Station and was located where the railroad crossed State Road by the Joe Eisle farm,  then owned by John C. Fowler, father of Marguerite Fowler who died in 1994 at 103.  There was a creamery located behind the farm up State Road just a little past the Eisle house called Kaufman’s Creamery and the “Kaufman’s Station” was a square boxy little building where people could wait to pick up the train.  There was also a milk stand there where cans were left for pickup.  John Fowler eventually became the express messenger for the Andes Branch as well as operating the dairy farm.  Marguerite said that he had always had a fascination with trains and had always wanted to work on one.]

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Wednesday evening the Village Trustees awarded the contract for lighting the street lamps to Barton Gladstone. [Note: According to Jim Andrews the street lamps were the kerosene ones that were lit every night at dusk and were extinguished every night at 10.  The village paid someone to light, extinguish, and fill the lamps and trim the wicks.]~